Plan your non fiction book #23 – How to write a back blurb to attract your ideal reader

How to write a back blurb for your book

Now that you have worked out who your reader is, try writing your book-pitch. This is the written sales pitch on the back of your book, usually called the back blurb. It provides your potential reader with an insight into your book. The book blurb should arouse curiosity, rather than provide answers. You are looking to draw your reader to “Look Inside”, browse through the first few pages and make a purchase.

  • Read the blurbs of books you own; what attracted you to them?
  • What do you like or dislike about the way the blurb is presented?
  • Take the ones you like, what do they all have in common?
  • Take three books whose blurb hooks you in and model yours on theirs
  • Imagine if you had 15 seconds to sell your book, what would be in those vital seconds?
  • What are the benefits?
  • How will your book fulfill its promise?
  • Is this the first of its kind?

Blurb

Practice writing your blurb

  • Write three versions of your blurb. Try them from different perspectives or starting points
  • Read each of them aloud; what needs to change?
  • Have you repeated any words?
  • Have you covered the senses of seeing, feeling and hearing (if relevant)?
  • See: We will show you how to….
  • Feel: We will touch on….
  • Hear: If you like the sound of x, then you will….
  • These may not all be relevant. Most blurbs use visual words – “we will show you”
  • Leave them for a few days for reflection

Letter to

Imagine that you are writing a letter to your friend, who knows you and your subject matter well; describe your book. Now do the same thing for someone you don’t know. What considerations did you have to make for the person that you know for and the stranger? Now rewrite your blurb.

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Plan your non fiction book
Plan your non fiction book

 

Plan your non fiction book in a weekend has been designed to help you to be able to undertake all of the vital planning tasks that make writing a book – simple and stress free

Each day to help you create your book, I am going to answer these essential planning questions:-

  • What kind of planner am I and why is this important to know?
  • What tools and resources do I need?
  • What is the process and cost of writing and publishing a book?
  • How long will it take me?
  • How do I get ideas for my book?
  • How do I choose the ONE big idea for my book?
  • What is an outline and how do I create one?
  • How can I structure my chapters?
  • How do I create and use a book proposal?

Plan your non fiction book #22 – What questions does your book answer?

Think about how well you know the ideal reader for your book. People buy books because of some sort of outcome, solution or result that it gives them. In this series of articles, we explore what makes an ideal reader and how to find yours.

What questions does your book answer?

The questions that your book answers, or the problems that it solves, is the next piece of the jigsaw. Think outside of who you currently consider to be your ideal reader. Who asks you what questions? Who are they and what will they get from reading your book?

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Look at old questions in new ways. What questions does your book answer?Problem and results

Look at what potential problems your readers may have and ask, what results do they get as a consequence of reading and using your content? List out all of the problems and what you believe the benefits will be for your readers. For example, a book on nutrition and sleep.

  • Problem: My sleep is disturbed
  • Results: By understanding which foods help you to produce the right chemicals in your brain, you can change your diet and learn to sleep well

Look at each of the problems and ask yourself, if this were my problem:-

  • How do I feel?
  • Why do I feel this way?
  • What are the facts?
  • What do I know to be true?
  • What do I have?
  • What don’t I have?
  • What other forces are influencing this problem?
  • What if I could solve it?
  • What if I couldn’t solve it, what then?

Do this for as many problems you think your book will help your reader solve. Once you have worked out what each of the problems are, and how they will be resolved, you will be able to map them to chapters.

Complete the ‘problem and results’ worksheet (below) to help focus your mind on what issues your reader may be facing and which you could help them with

Ten questions

Choose ten questions that your book answers for your ideal reader. If you know these, it is easier to stay on track when you come to writing your content and connecting to your reader.

E.g. What foods do I need to eat to ensure a good night’s sleep?

What is great about your questions is that they also make brilliant chapter headings.

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18 Problems and results

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Get your copy on Amazon

Plan your non fiction book
Plan your non fiction book

 

Plan your non fiction book in a weekend has been designed to help you to be able to undertake all of the vital planning tasks that make writing a book – simple and stress free

Each day to help you create your book, I am going to answer these essential planning questions:-

  • What kind of planner am I and why is this important to know?
  • What tools and resources do I need?
  • What is the process and cost of writing and publishing a book?
  • How long will it take me?
  • How do I get ideas for my book?
  • How do I choose the ONE big idea for my book?
  • What is an outline and how do I create one?
  • How can I structure my chapters?
  • How do I create and use a book proposal?

Plan your non fiction book #21 – Creating Ideal reader archetypes

Think about how well you know the ideal reader for your book. People buy books because of some sort of outcome, solution or result that it gives them. In this series of articles, we explore what makes an ideal reader and how to find yours.

Who is your ideal reader?

Reader archetypes

Trying to come up with ‘your reader archetype’ is a lot of fun. This is where you create a written profile of your reader, looking at what they may read, what they drink, where they go on holiday. When you have finished, leave it and reflect; then come back and draw your ideal reader. After this, collect pictures of things that connect you to your reader and create a scrapbook page.

Complete the ‘reader archetype’ worksheet which is available for a share below.

The picture of your reader

Which hat does your ideal reader wearDraw a picture of your reader. Do this by collecting images of things that you think encapsulates who your reader is. Collect photos of: –

  • Where you think they may live
  • What would they eat?
  • Their perfect holiday
  • Pets
  • Hobbies

As you can see, there are many ways to classify your reader, these are included to stimulate your thinking.

Leave these exercises for a day or two. When you come back after a period of reflection you should be clearer.

Knowing your ideal reader is one part of the knowing what the heart spot for your book

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17 Reader archetype

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Plan your non-fiction book in a weekend

Plan your non fiction book in a weekend has been designed to help you to be able to undertake all of the vital planning tasks that make writing a book – simple and stress free

Each day to help you create your book, I am going to answer these essential planning questions:-

  • What kind of planner am I and why is this important to know?
  • What tools and resources do I need?
  • What is the process and cost of writing and publishing a book?
  • How long will it take me?
  • How do I get ideas for my book?
  • How do I choose the ONE big idea for my book?
  • What is an outline and how do I create one?
  • How can I structure my chapters?
  • How do I create and use a book proposal?
  • How to I get my book written?

Plan your non fiction book #20 – who is your ideal reader?

Think about how well you know the ideal reader for your book. People buy books because of some sort of outcome, solution or result that it gives them. In this series of articles, we explore what makes an ideal reader and how to find yours.

Who is your ideal reader?

How well do you know the wants and needs of your ideal reader? When you write you are looking to connect to one reader. A single reader. Why?

  • Much easier to write because we are speaking to that person
  • It will make a better book, one which creates a connection
  • It is more likely to be read and enjoyed. If we write for one reader he/she will implement what we are teaching, will hear or enjoy what we have to say.
  • When you adjust your voice for your reader, it becomes just as if you were talking face to face
  • It is more likely to sell. There is a place for a book as a personal journey for ourselves, but the reality is that most of us want our books sell and to be read

It may not seem like a ‘nice’ idea to see your reader as a self-centred creature only out for what they can get, but the reality is that our reader wants to know WIIFM – what’s in it for me? Unless it is a present for someone else, they are not going to buy your book on “better health for menopausal women if they are a young gad-about-town twenty-something. Menopause is far away and is what their granny has.

It's easier to write and sell your book when you know who your ideal reader is

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For clarity, a target market is made up of buyers and readers:-

  • Buyers – people we attract to buy (these will be the reader and anyone who buys for others)
  • Readers – these are the ones we want to connect to and communicate with emotionally
  • Readers and buyers = your audience

Knowing who your buyers and readers are, and why you are writing for them, will help you clarify what to write about

Keep asking yourself: –

  • Who are you writing for? This might be you, someone like you, someone you have solved a problem for or another reason
  • If you were buying this book, why?
  • Who do you think your ideal reader is, right now?

By knowing who your ideal reader is it makes it easier to write for them, because we can speak directly to them. By speaking directly to them we have a better chance of making an emotional connection and by connecting, we have a better opportunity to sell more books or supplemental products and services.

You want to speak directly to your one reader by connecting to them on an emotional level. Try this archetype exercise, have some fun in this first step to uncovering who you will be writing for.

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17 Reader archetype

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Get your copy on Amazon

Plan your non fiction book
Plan your non fiction book

 

Plan your non fiction book in a weekend has been designed to help you to be able to undertake all of the vital planning tasks that make writing a book – simple and stress free

Each day to help you create your book, I am going to answer these essential planning questions:-

  • What kind of planner am I and why is this important to know?
  • What tools and resources do I need?
  • What is the process and cost of writing and publishing a book?
  • How long will it take me?
  • How do I get ideas for my book?
  • How do I choose the ONE big idea for my book?
  • What is an outline and how do I create one?
  • How can I structure my chapters?
  • How do I create and use a book proposal?