Plan your non fiction book #19 – Getting ideas, a week of observation

In the last blog, I talked about space and creating space for your ideas to be allowed to saunter around your mind and have room to wander and explore. I invited you to create an ideas wall, in this post I want to invite you to expand your ideas wall and give yourself the gift of a week of observation. Get yourself a notebook and remember to use the voice recorder or video on your phone to capture what you notice.To get ideas for your book, you need to become a witness to your life

[Tweet “To get ideas for your book, you need to become a witness to life”]

The key is to try to notice more of what is going on around you. Take a pen and notebook and phone wherever you go, observe, notice and listen. Who do you meet, what do they say? What is the colour of the train you catch to work? What is the first thing you smell when you wake up? What sounds are around you as you step out of the house? Count how many trees there are on the way to the local shop.

How often do you fail to notice what is going on, right under your nose. You become blinded to the obvious. You might get complimented on some great advice and not even realise that, the advice you give time and time again is the key to your book.

One of things I do is to go for a walk, stop and listen. When I think I can hear what is around me, I extend my hearing to see if I can hear things from further away and then a bit further.

I do the same thing with looking at what is around me. It took me some time to realise that where I walk every day, it is full of wild herbs. Now when I want rosemary potatoes, I pop to the rambla and not the shops.

When you start to notice, you begin to realise that you spend most of your life filtering things out.

Filtering out is for very good reason, the last thing you want is to go completely insane with all of the ‘noise’ that is going on in the world. However, humans are very good at filtering out some very useful information too.

Take the time to read your notebook and listen to your videos or voice recordings and pop up words, ideas, concepts, connections, mad crazy thoughts and whatever comes up onto your wall.

Have fun, remember with a brainstorming wall there are no rules, now right or wrong, there are just thoughts and ideas.

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Plan your non fiction book
Plan your non fiction book

 

Plan your non fiction book in a weekend has been designed to help you to be able to undertake all of the vital planning tasks that make writing a book – simple and stress free

Each day to help you create your book, I am going to answer these essential planning questions:-

  • What kind of planner am I and why is this important to know?
  • What tools and resources do I need?
  • What is the process and cost of writing and publishing a book?
  • How long will it take me?
  • How do I get ideas for my book?
  • How do I choose the ONE big idea for my book?
  • What is an outline and how do I create one?
  • How can I structure my chapters?
  • How do I create and use a book proposal?

 

 

Plan your non fiction book #18 – Getting ideas for your book #1

Where do ideas come from?

Ideas are all inside and outside of you; they are everywhere. The question is really, how do ideas come to you? Do they just pop into our minds or do ideas come as a result of lots of small things happening, which, when a good connection is made, creates a new idea pathway, so that a bit more of that idea is known?

Coding our experiences and emotions

In every moment, you consume information through your five (or six) senses. These are laid down in your mind-map using your language and coding structure, waiting to be fertilised with another germ of an idea. All these are waiting to be joined by that one all-important connector, which creates the spark and drives it to the forefront of your mind until you get that “eureka” moment.

If you provide yourself with the opportunity to become creative by giving yourself space, people to collaborate with and time to reflect, you will be able to exchange and borrow ideas in order to cultivate new ones. Ideas can be incubated for years, but appear in what seems a moment with the right stimulus.

Thoughts and ideas come in through the right brain hemisphere as the big picture, and are filtered into detail in the left hemisphere, with both sides working together to enable us to form relationships. What we as writers are looking for is the ‘something’ that sparks us up and ignites the journey through the mind, to create an inspirational network of new ideas and things to write about.

Space

Finding the right place (and space) to write or think in is paramount to creativity. In bed, the lounge, conservatory, your office, in your favourite comfy chair. It is important that you find a space or place where you feel at ease, which relaxes you, and provides you with the comfort and space to begin to write.

 Ideas need space, where is your space?

If writing in bed allows your creativity to flow, write there. If you get disturbed, which may cause frustration and anger, go somewhere else and try to recreate the cosy feelings that your bed does. I write in a variety of places and at different times, not through choice but because I get annoyed and demotivated when I get disturbed. In each location, I make the space work for me.

What else do you need in your space? For example, if you are an auditory person you may like to have some music on, if you are kinaesthetic, you might like to have beautiful things that you can feel, and if you are visual, you might like to be in a place where you can see lovely things.

There are other things that you may like; for example, to burn incense or light a scented candle. If you love your food how about a good cup of tea and some raw chocolates? Take some time out to consider your space, what needs to be there or not, to make it the best writing and creative space for you.

[Tweet “What goes into your creative writing space, which allows the ideas to flow?”]

Headspace

Space is also giving yourself headspace, finding ways to slow down the hustle and bustle of everyday life and give yourself time to think. Thinking is good and is a perfect way to generate new ideas.

Create your brainstorming book ideas wall

Find yourself a blank wall and use this to collate any book ideas that you have. This ‘space’ needs to be somewhere that you pass often. Where you can just be and where you feel comfortable to just stand and stare,

This is where all of your book ideas and ideas around your book will go. Get your post-it notes, start writing down your book ideas, one per post-it, and start plastering a spare wall, back of the door or onto a piece of flip chart paper. No holds barred.

Then start adding anything that is related to each of the potential book ideas. If you don’t like this approach, use a mind map or make a list.

Do this for one week and at the end, I promise you will be brimming with lots of brilliant concepts.

Remember to keep giving yourself ‘space’ to think and allow the ideas to flow.

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Plan your non fiction book
Plan your non fiction book

 

Plan your non fiction book in a weekend has been designed to help you to be able to undertake all of the vital planning tasks that make writing a book – simple and stress free

Each day to help you create your book, I am going to answer these essential planning questions:-

  • What kind of planner am I and why is this important to know?
  • What tools and resources do I need?
  • What is the process and cost of writing and publishing a book?
  • How long will it take me?
  • How do I get ideas for my book?
  • How do I choose the ONE big idea for my book?
  • What is an outline and how do I create one?
  • How can I structure my chapters?
  • How do I create and use a book proposal?

 

 

Plan your non fiction book #17 – Your book cover design

The importance of your book cover design

 

We’ve all heard don’t judge a book by its cover, but we do. I do the same with bottles of wine – I look at the label, and it does persuade me to buy or otherwise. Of course, the wine or book may have been recommended, or I know the grape or the book genre. Otherwise, I do make judgments about what I see and so will your readers.

The book cover is your first opportunity to make a sales pitch. It also is your first opportunity to make an emotional connection to your reader.

The cover does build up a picture in your reader’s mind of what to expect once they open up your book. Neither of these book covers started life like this. Now they convey beautifully what they do.

Anandi -breathe better, sleep betterMotivate yourself - Andro Donovan

 

The right image for your book cover

Your book cover is one of the first emotional connections you make with your reader

Also consider the importance of the right image. As you can see, my illustration (on the book at the bottom of this blog) is unique and has been drawn just for me. You can, of course, buy off the shelf images (check the usage terms), but you may find that others are using that image for other things that may not fit with your brand. We will talk about images in another blog.

The book cover specification

The specification makes it easier for your book cover designer to create the right design.

Make sure you give your designer a specification. I cobble a Jacqui book cover idea together with lots of information for my designer so that she/he can see into my crazy mind and start to understand what I want. I always say ‘you are the designer and the artist, so you must use your creative talents’. I think that it is only fair that you give them a starting point, and so should you. Designers are not mind readers.

[Tweet “Ultimately the cover designer’s job is to make your book pickupable by your ideal reader.”]

Consider print finishes

If you are having your books printed for an event or to sell from your website, consider who you use. Use a team that have years of experience who know not only what should go onto the cover, but how the cover should be finished. Lamination, for example, will protect the cover. And there are lots of other things that can be added to make your cover beautiful and create more impact. Your cover becomes almost like a piece of art. When you are next caressing a book in your local bookshop, stop and think about the time and effort that has gone into giving you that experience. Would you like that for your book and your readers? On Amazon, you are offered matte or shiny. Matte every time for me, please.

What to do next

  • Download your cover design specification and start pulling together things that you like and don’t like
  • Browse your local bookstore and feel the covers
  • Call Andy and discuss your options
  • Do not make your own cover – it shows and is will look unprofessional

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Book cover SPECIFICATIONCover design brief V2

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Plan your non-fiction book in a weekend

Plan your non-fiction book in a weekend has been designed to help you to be able to undertake all of the vital planning tasks that make writing a book – simple and stress-free

Each day to help you create your book, I am going to answer these essential planning questions:-

  • What kind of planner am I and why is this important to know?
  • What tools and resources do I need?
  • What is the process and cost of writing and publishing a book?
  • How long will it take me?
  • How do I get ideas for my book?
  • How do I choose the ONE big idea for my book?
  • What is an outline and how do I create one?
  • How can I structure my chapters?
  • How do I create and use a book proposal?
  • How do I get to first draft and beyond?

Plan your non fiction book #16 – getting your writing timetable to work for you

Important factors for your writing timetable to work

It’s not just about putting pen to paper there are some other factors that you need to consider when starting to write:-

Discipline

You need discipline – full stop. Sometimes it is very difficult being disciplined and getting on with your plan, writing or editing. The dog needs walking, the kids need feeding, and your clothes need ironing! Look at your writing plan, the number of words you set yourself and the time you allowed. Stick to it and you will create a habit. When you have created a habit, this will be hard to break. Consider the behavioural patterns that you have, understand yourself and try to flex your style.

Setting boundaries

  • Let your important people know that you need time and space to write
  • Give yourself permission to take the time out to write
  • When it comes to writing, set a timer so that you write for your optimal period of time and ensure you take a rest

Creating THE right environment for you

Where gives you the most peace to write?

[Tweet “If your space is not right, with the best will in the world, writing will become a chore. “]

Turn all the noise off; that means phones, internet and any other distraction. Do you need to go to a coffee shop or sit in a cafe? Is there a space in your home that is just right for you? What about a certain chair or room? Only you will know.

Right tools

Pen, paper, computer, Dictaphone etc. What do you need? Nothing is more frustrating than discovering that there is no paper or ink in your printer when you need to print and edit.

Right frame of mind

there is not one formula for creating a writing timetable. there is only your formulaYour mind-set may be fixed with certain beliefs about your ability to write this book. I want you to challenge that fixed system, take a hammer to it and shatter it.

Using the power of positive thought is well documented. Feeling positive about yourself and your book is no different and will result in successful outcomes. Where you focus your thoughts, actions will follow and consistent actions lead to great habits.

Breathe and meditate, just let your unconscious mind go free. Settle and ground yourself. Ask yourself, what do you have to do to get into the right frame of mind?

Reflect

Without a doubt when you get to the end of your first draft you will need to stop and leave your work for at least one week. There will be other times that you need to stop and think. Factor them in. Sometimes procrastination is just the way our brains are saying –‘I’ve had enough, just for now.’ Stop and reflect often.

Diary, to-do list or timetable

Where are you going to record the dates and times for your writing timetable? Using your day-to-day digital diaries is great as you have a visual of when and if you can set an alarm as an auditory reminder of when to start.

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Plan your non fiction book
Plan your non fiction book

 

Plan your non fiction book in a weekend has been designed to help you to be able to undertake all of the vital planning tasks that make writing a book – simple and stress free

Each day to help you create your book, I am going to answer these essential planning questions:-

  • What kind of planner am I and why is this important to know?
  • What tools and resources do I need?
  • What is the process and cost of writing and publishing a book?
  • How long will it take me?
  • How do I get ideas for my book?
  • How do I choose the ONE big idea for my book?
  • What is an outline and how do I create one?
  • How can I structure my chapters?
  • How do I create and use a book proposal?

 

 

Plan your non fiction book #15 – Your writing process

Your writing process

[Tweet “No two people write in the same way, so you need to find a way that works just for you.”]

Whatever that way is, it is perfect. When we want to go somewhere, we use a map. Your process is your unique map.

To find out what your map is, it would be useful to understand how another writer writes and notice his or her patterns. In a perfect world, we should be able to interview, watch and fully understand how an expert writer operates. Sadly, we don’t live in an ideal world, and you may not have access to other writers over the weekend – but you could plan for some interview time. This means that you will have to map out what you do and how you do it. Analyse it and work out how you can become more effective and efficient in the process, or accept the way in which you do things and make allowances. Remember, you are not alone and there are always tools, people and resources which you can call on for help.

To work out what your process is you must walk through all of the steps that you take.

The kemap your writing process and you will reach your destination - published authory now is to think about how you will get the most value out of your writing process. After I have outlined my book, I start by mapping out what I think I want to write about using a ‘what’, ‘why’, ‘how’ and ‘what if’ framework (more on that later). I look at key words, key messages and concepts, calls to action and I consider how it fits together and flows. After a period of reflection, I undertake a knowledge audit, which tells me what I can re-purpose, what needs researching and what I can write straight off. Then its write, write, write! Followed by periods of editing and more writing. Followed by remapping and reflecting. I am not linear in the way that I work and I have to force myself to keep coming back to my plan and refocusing. I am extremely good at writing too much and brutal at editing.

Go back and look at your process:-

  • What works?
  • What doesn’t?
  • What needs adapting?
  • In a perfect world how would you write?
  • What is your process?

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Plan your non fiction book
Plan your non fiction book

 

Plan your non fiction book in a weekend has been designed to help you to be able to undertake all of the vital planning tasks that make writing a book – simple and stress free

Each day to help you create your book, I am going to answer these essential planning questions:-

  • What kind of planner am I and why is this important to know?
  • What tools and resources do I need?
  • What is the process and cost of writing and publishing a book?
  • How long will it take me?
  • How do I get ideas for my book?
  • How do I choose the ONE big idea for my book?
  • What is an outline and how do I create one?
  • How can I structure my chapters?
  • How do I create and use a book proposal?

 

 

Plan your non fiction book #14 – How long it will take to write?

Working out how long it will take to write

I am often asked how long it will take to write a book. This of course depends on lots of variables… It mostly comes down to your commitment!

If you are writing an e-book then you are looking at 50-100 pages, where each page is approximately 350-400 words, which makes it roughly 20,000 to 30,000 words. If you are writing a traditional self-published book anything over 40,000 words. The number of words per page in a print book will differ, as you will be creating a book to a specific page size, e.g. 6×9 rather than A4.

  • Imagine your book is 20,000 words
  • How many words can you write in an hour? 500 or 1000?
  • How many words can you write per day? 1000, 2000 or 3000?
  • Will you write every day, or will you set a weekly target?

This is clearly not an exact science, but it will focus your mind on your writing outcomes. If you are the kind of person who goes into overwhelm when you see big numbers, focus on the small numbers, i.e. the number of words per hour or per day.

The process is:-

  • First draft (write, don’t edit)
  • First edit
  • Second and third edit
  • First print proof (I always do this step, even for a digital book)
  • Final edit
  • Proof-reader
  • Second print proof

I find reading as a ‘real’ book helps me to see it in another light. Once I have done my final edit, which I call my final proof, I will send it to the proof-reader, which normally takes about 2 weeks.

You may additionally send your proof books to beta-readers before the proof-reader gets it. Beta-readers are trusted friends and colleagues who will not only review it for you, but they will also point out any errors.

Timed tests

These tests are designed to help you find out how you work and how long, given the right ingredients, it will take you to write.

Test 1

Start by timing yourself for 30 minutes. Pick something that you are an expert in and just write. How many words can you type or write long-hand?

Test 2

This time you are going to write 500 words on one of the following:-

  • The role of water in weight loss
  • Why does hair turn grey?
  • Top ten foods to help you sleep.
  • A topic of your choice

no matter how busy you are, take the time to write. you could change your lifeWrite down your start time; carry on writing until the article is polished and ready for publication. (For the weekend trial, do this in 30 minutes if you can).

  • How long did it take you?
  • Now add 20% for interruptions, procrastination and other stuff
  • Did you remember to factor in planning, research and editing?
  • How much knowledge did you have before you started?
  • What process did you go through to undertake your research?

[Tweet ” Ask yourself when do you want to publish? How long will it take to write your book? What commitment will you make?”]

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Plan your non fiction book
Plan your non fiction book

 

Plan your non fiction book in a weekend has been designed to help you to be able to undertake all of the vital planning tasks that make writing a book – simple and stress free

Each day to help you create your book, I am going to answer these essential planning questions:-

  • What kind of planner am I and why is this important to know?
  • What tools and resources do I need?
  • What is the process and cost of writing and publishing a book?
  • How long will it take me?
  • How do I get ideas for my book?
  • How do I choose the ONE big idea for my book?
  • What is an outline and how do I create one?
  • How can I structure my chapters?
  • How do I create and use a book proposal?

 

Plan your non fiction book #13 – Who can support you?

Who can support and hold you accountable ensuring you get your book written?

Along the way, you may need to outsource some of your activities.

Here are a few of those potential partners that you may need to support you.

  • Proof reader – the person who checks for punctuation, spelling and grammar
  • Editor – there are levels of editor, they check for consistency, sense and undertake a deeper review
  • Designer – the person or team that creates your book cover, images and interior design layout (for both print and digital e.g. Kindle)
  • Ghost writer – Someone who writes some or all of your book for you
  • Printer – Although you will most likely publish through Amazon’s CreateSpace for your print book, you may also want to undertake a more cost-effective print run with a traditional printer (for use at your launch and speaker events)
  • Launch and other marketing – It is important that you consider how you will market your book now and start to get the resources in place
  • Website – If you don’t have a website, get one and if you have one, make space for your book and author profile

You can recruit your support crew from one of the many online sites such as Elance, (http://elance.com) or Fiverr (http://fiverr.com) where can choose from a vast selection of freelancers. I have used some fantastic people on Fiverr and some equally useless ones. What I have learnt is that you need to write a great specification and trial their work. My preference is to work with people I can talk to face-to-face, or on Skype or G+.

Get a coach

It’s easy to give up. When we are alone, we listen to our negative thoughts more than our positive ones. It’s not always easy to be our own coach.

[Tweet “A good book coach will keep you motivated and taking consistent action. “]

When you are stuck or resistant, fed up, or procrastinating, your coach is by your side or at the end of the phone or email. Your coach has the experience and knowledge to know what needs to be done to help you to reach your book publication date. They will hold you accountable, keep you on track, challenge you, have fun with you, share resources and a whole host of other things, and you would be mad to pay for someone’s time and not maximise it.

If your book raises personal issues and upsets, discuss this with your book coach who may be suitably trained to help you. If not, they can advise you where to go to get professional help for the area that you are struggling with.

Get yourself a planning and writing buddy

Similar to your coach, a planning and writing buddy is someone you trust to read your work without judgment, to challenge you, and to talk through your fears. They may be your best friend, a parent or someone from an online writing community. They don’t have to spend lots of time; it could just be something simple like a weekly phone call to ask “have you written your next 3000 words and what help do you need to get through the next 3000?”

you can do anything with purpose, action and supportI get that you may not want to share your writing with anyone else, but…. Let me share some great reasons why it does work and will work for you. First of all get rid of your ‘fear,’ remember false evidence appearing real; you do not have a crystal ball and you do not know what someone else will think. AND remember, all feedback is ‘the breakfast of champions.’ Listen to what is being said with an open heart, and you will learn a lot, I promise.

  • Having someone to write with can be lots of fun. Mum and I have what we call write-offs.  We pick a subject and just write. Usually we do what we laughingly call poetry. We don’t care, we enjoy it
  • Having a buddy builds your trust and faith in your writing. Mum and I also chat to each other about our writing, because we have absolute trust in each other. We can discuss our hopes, fears, plot lines and motivation
  • Someone else can see the lack of flow and inconsistencies. We get too close to our writing, and it all looks great – get over it, no it doesn’t, because we get word blindness
  • Other people can come up with ideas that we never even thought of – thank you so much, this is one of my faves
  • You get asked good questions, which gives you the opportunity to reflect – and to improve your copy
  • You will get a better idea of what your reader really wants – remember, it’s all about the reader not you
  • You get an opportunity to help someone else become a better writer

Finding a writing buddy

  • Who do you know that you could share your writing with?
  • Ask them to be your writing buddy
  • Meet up for coffee
  • Pick a subject and write
  • Agree how feedback will be given
  • Celebrate every success

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Plan your non fiction book
Plan your non fiction book

 

Plan your non fiction book in a weekend has been designed to help you to be able to undertake all of the vital planning tasks that make writing a book – simple and stress free

Each day to help you create your book, I am going to answer these essential planning questions:-

  • What kind of planner am I and why is this important to know?
  • What tools and resources do I need?
  • What is the process and cost of writing and publishing a book?
  • How long will it take me?
  • How do I get ideas for my book?
  • How do I choose the ONE big idea for my book?
  • What is an outline and how do I create one?
  • How can I structure my chapters?
  • How do I create and use a book proposal?

 

Plan your non fiction book #12 – What is the potential cost of writing a book

The potential cost of writing your book

Whenever I am asked the question “what is the cost of writing a book” my response is usually

[Tweet “what is the cost of NOT writing your book?”]

Remember (and it certainly feels like it) that it takes approximately 700 hours to produce a non-fiction book. For someone who does it all themselves, a simple calculation will tell you how much it would cost if you paid someone (yourself) by the hour. Go on; multiply your hourly rate by 700: scary isn’t it? However, think of the VALUE that the book brings, along with the personal development that you get, add in credibility and opportunities, and wow!!

Generally, most authors do not do everything themselves; they will pay for a book coach, copy editor/proof-reader, cover designer, formatter and someone to upload to Amazon. Your role is to write and edit (until it goes to your proof reader).

[Tweet “I rarely think about the costs to manufacture a book, as a book for me is an investment in my personal brand and my future. “]

Your ‘costed’ time and other costs are ‘sunk costs’, they are the investment that you make, to differentiate you and your personal brand. Your ideas and unique voice which lead to your book are your intellectual property, and if done well can lead to sustainable growth and future profitability.

Take time to ponder the cost question before moving on and consider these three words – cost, price and value. We will look at pricing in a future.

So what is the cost?

In accounting terms, it is the cost of producing something e.g.

  • Time
  • Materials
  • Research and development
  • Prototyping
  • Overheads (recurring costs)
  • Marketing
  • Any one-off costs
  • Outsourced items, time, products, manufacturing

From a writer’s point of view, cost is the amount of money and time spent to produce his or her book. Here is the funny (or not so funny) part: if you could sell your books at the production cost, no-one would ever buy them – imagine all of those hours writing and editing at your hourly rate. Even if you do everything, yourself it is still not FREE, because your time is money.

 So, why would you write a book?

Because of the value it brings.

The value is what you gain from becoming a published author. The value comes in what a book gives you:-

  • Brand awareness
  • Credibility
  • Profile building
  • Platform
  • Ability to find and share your voice
  • Enables you to shape the future and influence change
  • Educate others by reaching out with your knowledge, skills and experience
  • Promote yourself more effectively
  • Connect to a wider audience
  • Build a community, campaign for a cause, create a different future
  • Build your confidence
  • Enable collaboration and collaborative thinking
  • Personal growth and development
  • Motivation and inspiration
  • The list goes on….

[Tweet “If your dream is to get more clients, have more speaker opportunities, build your brand, and become more successful, a book will help you to do that.”]

If, on the back of your book, you were able to book more clients at a higher price, get more speaker bookings, be able to create an online course, the cost of your book would be recouped in no time at all.

[Tweet “The cost and price of your book is largely immaterial, it is the value of it to you which is more important.”]

It’s good and wise to understand the economics of producing a book, of course it is, but ultimately, let me say it again: it is the value that YOUR BOOK brings YOU which is more meaningful.

When you are considering your book, ensure that you pull the costs together, decide what you will do and what you will outsource. AND… Make sure that you have put together your personal brand and marketing plan, so that you know up front what is the value of your book and how you are going to use it to make money.

What is the cost of not writing your book

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Plan your non fiction book
Plan your non fiction book

Plan your non fiction book in a weekend has been designed to help you to be able to undertake all of the vital planning tasks that make writing a book – simple and stress free

Each day to help you create your book, I am going to answer these essential planning questions:-

  • What kind of planner am I and why is this important to know?
  • What tools and resources do I need?
  • What is the process and cost of writing and publishing a book?
  • How long will it take me?
  • How do I get ideas for my book?
  • How do I choose the ONE big idea for my book?
  • What is an outline and how do I create one?
  • How can I structure my chapters?
  • How do I create and use a book proposal?

Plan your non fiction book #11 – creating a vision for your book exercise

Creating a vision for your book exercise

This is a fun exercise that really works and gets you out of the house and walking.

[Tweet “Watch this great visioning exercise for getting to the write book to write”]

Walk towards your vision

Take your phone with you and record what comes up for you.

Then map out your actions.

Remember to scribble thoughts and ideas as they come to you. It all comes in handy.

[Tweet “Write because the future is brighter when your message & vision are shared.”]

Write because the future is brighter when your message & vision are shared

 

That’s it, that’s all I want you to do today is imagine the future with your book in your hand.

To get your free chapter ‘Values to Vision’ please share the love

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Plan your non fiction book
Plan your non fiction book – FREE Chapter

 

 

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Plan your non fiction book in a weekend has been designed to help you to be able to undertake all of the vital planning tasks that make writing a book – simple and stress free

Each day to help you create your book, I am going to answer these essential planning questions:-

  • What kind of planner am I and why is this important to know?
  • What tools and resources do I need?
  • What is the process and cost of writing and publishing a book?
  • How long will it take me?
  • How do I get ideas for my book?
  • How do I choose the ONE big idea for my book?
  • What is an outline and how do I create one?
  • How can I structure my chapters?
  • How do I create and use a book proposal?

Get your copy on Amazon

Plan your non fiction book
Plan your non fiction book

 

 

 

 

 

Plan your non fiction book #10 – do something else

I recently asked you what your vision for your book was and then I suggested you did nothing. Today I am suggesting that you do something else.

Do something else

Today do something else

[Tweet “Taking time out to do something unrelated to your book is great for getting fresh insight”]

This is what I did today to get my creative juices flowing. I went for a walk and thought about lots of ways the things I found could be used.

 

 

Ideas and uses for things found on a walk

1. Oranges – great for Vit C and very refreshing
2. Old tiles – paint and use for wall lightsWrite because you can take time off to do something else.  And know that doing that other thing will refresh and inspire you to write more.
3. Chumba (if it wasn’t infested) prickly pear cider
4. Inspiration for a painting
5. Water – the elixir of life
6. Sun for Vit D and making you feel great
7. Rocks to sit on – it’s good to take a rest
8. Branches to hold on to. We all need some support
9. Sticks to play with and to walk with
10. Lavender – wonderful to smell and very calming

Tomorrow when you wake get out your journal and ask ‘what is the vision for my book now?’

Leave a comment because I want to know.

Remember to scribble thoughts and ideas as they come to you. Keep them safe we will be looking more at vision over the next few days.

To get your free chapter ‘Values to Vision’ please share the love

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Plan your non fiction book
Plan your non fiction book – FREE Chapter

 

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